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LAWRENCE Barbara Jane (Agda)

LAWRENCE Barbara Jane (Agda)

Female 1857 - 1929

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All

  • Name  LAWRENCE Barbara Jane (Agda) 
    Born  4 Jun 1857  Scone, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Female 
    _PPEXCLUDE  nonec 
    _UID  16EF022E4D514C58992F5D636854620B2893 
    Died  28 May 1929  Toorak, Victoria, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Cerebral Thrombosis, Pneumonia 
    Buried  Fawkner Crematorium, Victoria, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Ashes to be placed beside that of her second husband, Thomas Baynton, at Waverley Cemetery, Sydney, NSW
    Person ID  I572  Frater Genealogy
    Last Modified  17 Jan 2017 

    Father  LAWRENCE John,   b. 1818, Londonderry, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  EWART Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1820, Londonderry, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Oct 1898, Murrurundi, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  3 Jun 1839  Londonderry, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F750  Group Sheet

    Family 1  FRATER Alexander (Doc),   b. 9 Mar 1859, Trinkey Property, Liverpool Plains, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Jul 1931, 174 Roger Road, Lakemba, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  24 Jun 1880  Presbyterian Church, Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Divorced  4 Mar 1890 
    Children 
     1. FRATER Alexander (Lappy) Hay,   b. 3 Nov 1881, Coonamble, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jul 1961, Repatriation General Hoespital, Concord, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. FRATER Robert (Weed) Guy,   b. Sep 1883, Magaormadine, Coonamble, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jan 1965, New End Hospital, Hampstead, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. FRATER Elizabeth Penelope,   b. 4 Jun 1885, Coonamble, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Dec 1960, Victoria, Australia. Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  25 Feb 2013 
    Family ID  F184  Group Sheet

    Family 2  BAYNTON Thomas,   b. 19 Oct 1819, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jun 1904, Ashfield, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  5 Mar 1890  St Philips Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    • Witnesses: May O'Neile and John Acton.
      Minister: George Moore.

      There is a weird thing about this marriage, for some unknown reason Thomas and Barbara married a second time on the 12 November 1995 five years later, the second marriage was at the Ministers residence, in Legenhoe Street, Arncliffe, Rockdale Municipality. Witnesses to the 2nd marriage where Isabella Monahan and Rose Monahan who where also related to the Minister, J. Monahan. Gives no other details other on this marriage. Wonder why a second marriage, where they not legally married the first time???
    Children 
     1. BAYNTON Infant Son,   d. 1891
    Last Modified  15 Apr 2013 
    Family ID  F3025  Group Sheet

    Family 3  BAYNTON Thomas,   b. Abt 1820, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jun 1904, Ashfield, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  12 Nov 1895  Ministers Residence, Legenhoe St, Arncliffe, Rockdale, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Witnesses: Isabella Monahan and Rose Monahan.
      Minister: J. Monahan.
    Last Modified  26 Dec 2008 
    Family ID  F3060  Group Sheet

    Family 4  WINN Rowland George Allanson (5Th Baron Headley),   b. 19 Jan 1855, London, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jun 1935, London, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  11 Feb 1921  Marylebone Registery Office, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Divorced  10 Jun 1924 
    Last Modified  25 Feb 2013 
    Family ID  F3026  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    Barbara Lawrence
    Barbara Lawrence

    News

    » Slide Show
    Published in 'The Australia' Spring 1982
    Published in "The Australia" Spring 1982
    Page 1.
    Published in 'The Australia' Spring 1982
    Published in "The Australia" Spring 1982
    Page 2.
    Published in 'The Australia' Spring 1982
    Published in "The Australia" Spring 1982
    Page 3.
    Published in 'The Australia' Spring 1982
    Published in "The Australia" Spring 1982
    Page 4.
    Published in 'The Australia' Spring 1982
    Published in "The Australia" Spring 1982
    Page 5.
    Published in 'The Australia' Spring 1982
    Published in "The Australia" Spring 1982
    Page 6

  • Notes 
    • «i»Barbara Lawrence writer, was born on 4 June 1857 at Scone, New South Wales, youngest daughter of John Lawrence, carpenter, and his wife Elizabeth, née Ewart, who had arrived in Sydney from Londonderry, Ireland, as bounty immigrants in the Royal Consort on 9 November 1840. However Barbara later alleged that her father was Captain Robert Lawrence Kilpatrick of the Bengal Light Cavalry. By 1866 the Lawrences had moved to Murrurundi. Educated at home, Barbara enjoyed the works of Dickens and the Russian novelists; she became a governess with the Fraters at Merrylong Park, south of Quirindi. On 24 June 1880 at Tamworth Presbyterian Church she married Alexander Frater junior, a selector. Next year they moved to the Coonamble district, where she bore two sons and a daughter.In 1887 Frater ran off with Sarah Glover, a servant in his household; Barbara took her children to Sydney, instituted divorce proceedings and was granted a decree absolute on 4 March 1890. Next day at St Philip's Church of England, claiming to be a widow, she married a 70-year-old widower Thomas Baynton, who was a retired surgeon with literary and academic friends who visited his home at Woollahra. Financially secure, Barbara began to add to her husband's collection of Georgian silver and antiques. Robust and vigorous, overflowing with vitality, she also began to write short stories, verse and articles for the Bulletin. Her first story, 'The Tramp', was published in December 1896After failing to find a publisher in Sydney for her collection of six short stories, in 1902 Barbara Baynton visited London where, with the help of Edward Garnett, the critic, Bush Studies was published that year by Duckworth & Co. She did not romanticize bush life and showed a savage revulsion against its loneliness and harshness. 'A Dreamer', 'The Chosen Vessel', 'Scrammy 'and' and 'Squeaker's Mate' are chilling tales of terror and nightmare, built up detail by detail rather than by atmosphere and the supernatural. Stephens reviewed Bush Studies in the Bulletin, 14 February 1903: 'So precise, so complete, with such insight into detail and such force of statement, it ranks with the masterpieces of realism in any language'. To Vance Parmer, 'Bush Church' and 'Billy Skywonkie' had 'a robust masculine humour'. Writing powerfully, with economy of style, Baynton used certain symbolic and recurrent themes, notably the strong maternal instinct, the loyalty of the dog, the isolation of the bush and a bitter insistence on man's brutality to woman, which gave unity to the stories and lifted them above the plane of simple realism.In 1903 Barbara Baynton returned to Sydney where her husband died on 10 June 1904, leaving her his whole estate, valued for probate at £3871. She began investing on the Stock Exchange, particulary in the Law Book Co. of Australasia Ltd of which she later became chairman of directors. An astute businesswoman, she also bought and sold antiques and started her fine collection of black opals from Lightning Ridge. She contributed occasional forceful articles to the Sydney Morning Herald on the 'Indignity of Domestic Service' and other women's issues. She spent the next years between Australia and London, where she lived 'in a succession of increasingly fine houses', surrounded by Chinese lacquer, Chippendale furniture, ornate porcelain and silver. Something of a celebrity in literary circles, she entertained lavishly and knew many famous people. She found time to write her only novel, Human Toll (London, 1907) which, despite its melodrama and 'unsure management of structure', included in A. A. Phillips's opinion 'some of her most characteristic writing … and maturer insights into human behaviour'. During World War I she opened her house in Connaught Square to British and Australian soldiers, and in 1917 published Cobbers, a reissue of Bush Studies with two new stories, including 'Trooper Jim Tasman'.On 11 February 1921 Barbara Baynton married Rowland George Alanson-Winn, fifth baron Headley, president of the Society of Engineers and of the Muslim Society in England, and a sportsman. Next year he became bankrupt. Outraged when he refused the throne of Albania, she returned to Melbourne in a huff. She built a house at Toorak, near her daughter Penelope who had married (Sir) Henry Gullett in 1912, and furnished it with Queen Anne and Georgian pieces. Bored with it, she sold its contents with such success that she returned to England and brought back another shipload of antiques. Dark, with heavily lidded, watchful eyes, she loved jewellery, especially opals and pearls, and beautiful clothes. With considerable charm, 'a devastating wit', a caustic tongue and a domineering personality, she had the ability to amuse and impress people.Lady Headley died of cerebral thrombosis at her home at Toorak on 28 May 1929 and was cremated. Her estate was sworn for probate at £160,621. She was survived by her first and third husbands and by two sons and a daughter of her first marriage; a son by her second husband had died in infancy. Robert Guy Frater, her second son, inherited her adventurous spirit: he went to the South African War at 15, raised soldiers for a Chinese warlord, served in the Archduke Ferdinand's bodyguard at Sarajevo and, with his brother, fought with the British Army in World War I.

      «b»«/i»The Sydney Morning Herald, Wednesday 12 December 1888«/b»
      «b»LAW REPORT.«/b»
      «b»In Divorce.¾ (Before his Honor Mr. Justice Windeyer.)«/b»
      «b»FRATER V. FRATER.«/b»
      Mr. Ralston appeared for the petitioner, Barbara Frater, and applied that service upon the respondent, Alexander Frater the younger, formerly of Coonamble, grazier, might be dispensed with on the ground that respondent had no fixed occupation or place of residence, and was now engaged droving in various parts of the country. He had been served with the petition and citation and had not appeared. The application was granted, and the issues were settled as marriage at Tamworth on June 24, 1880, and adultery with one Sarah Glover during the years 1886 and 1887 at Narrabri and Walgett. The trial was fixed for the second day of next sittings without a jury.



      http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Lawrence-5978 (Tree of Kerry Byrne)
      «b»Biography
      «/b»BARBARA JANET LAWRENCE (Lawrence-5978)
      BIRTH. 4 Jun 1857, Scone, New South Wales, Australia
      MARRIAGE (1). 24 Jun 1880, Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia
      MARRIAGE (1). 24 Jun 1880, Alexander Frater, son of Alexander Frater & Penelope (Hay) Frater
      MARRIAGE (1). NSW BDM Marriage: #4969/1880: FRATER ALEXANDER, LAWRENCE BARBARA, District of TAMWORTH
      Children:
      (1) Alexander (Lappy) Hay Frater, b. 3 Nov 1881, Coonamble, New South Wales, Australia, d. 6 Jul 1961, Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
      (2) Robert (Weed) Guy Frater, b. Sep 1883, Magaormadine, Coonamble, New South Wales, Australia, d. 6 Jan 1965, New End Hospital, Hampstead, London, England
      (3) Elizabeth Penelope Frater, b. 4 Jun 1885, Coonamble, New South Wales, Australia, d. Dec 1960, Victoria, Australia, m. 2 Oct 1912, Marylebone, London, Henry Somer (Harry) Gullett, son of Charles William Gullett & Rose Mary (Somer) Gullett

      DIVORCE. 4 Mar 1890, decree nisi made absolute
      (1888). FRATER V. FRATER. Mr. Ralston appeared for the petitioner, Barbara Frater, and applied that service upon the respondent, Alexander Frater the younger, formerly of Coonamble, grazier, might be dispensed with on the ground that respondent had no fixed occupation or place of residence, and was now engaged droving in various parts of the country. He had been served with the petition and citation and had not appeared. The application was granted, and the issues were settled as marriage at Tamworth on June 24, 1880, and adultery with one Sarah Glover during the years 1886 mid 1887 at Narrabri and Walgett. The trial was fixed for the second day of next sittings without a jury.
      (1890). MR. JUSTICE WINDEYER sat for a short time in Divorce yesterday and granted an order . . . In Julian v. Julian and «i»Frater«/i» «i»v«/i» «i»Frater«/i» the decrees nisi for dissolution of marriage were made absolute.

      MARRIAGE (2a). 5 Mar 1890, St Philips Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
      MARRIAGE (2a). 5 Mar 1890, Barbara Jane (Agda?)/(Ainsleigh?) (Lawrence) Frater, daughter of John Lawrence & Elizabeth Ewart
      MARRIAGE (2a). NSW BDM Marriage Ref: #336/1890: BAYNTON THOMAS, FRATER BARBARA J A, District of SYDNEY
      MARRIAGE (2b). 12 Nov 1895, Minister's residence, Legenhoe Street, Arncliffe, Rockdale Municipality
      MARRIAGE (2b). 12 Nov 1895, Barbara Jane (Agda?)/(Ainsleigh?) Lawrence, daughter of John Lawrence & Elizabeth Ewart
      MARRIAGE (2b). NSW BDM Marriage Ref: #7646/1895: BAYNTON THOMAS, LAWRENCE BARBARA, District of ROCKDALE

      Death of Spouse: 10 Jun 1904, The Magomadine, Charlotte street, Ashfield, New South Wales, Australia

      MARRIAGE (3). 11 Feb 1921, Marylebone Registery Office, London, England
      MARRIAGE (3). 11 Feb 1921, Rowland George Allanson Winn, 5th Baron Headley, aka Shaikh Rahmatullah AL-FAROOQ «u»[1]«/u»
      MARRIAGE (3). 1921
      Name Barbara J A Baynton
      Event Type Marriage Registration
      Registration Quarter Jan-Feb-Mar
      Registration Year 1921
      Registration District Marylebone
      County London
      Event Place Marylebone, London, England
      Spouse Name (available after 1911) Allanson-Winn
      Volume 1A, Page 1291, Line Number 54
      PEERS ROMANCE. MARRIED AT REGISTRY OFFICE. Far-fetched Schemes. (UNITED SERVICE.) LONDON, To-day.\emdash Baron Headley, the versatile Peer who recently surprised society by announcing his conversion to Moslemism, was quietly married at the Marylebone registry office on Friday morning to Mrs. Barbara Baynton. There were only 8 present.
      The bridegroom walked to the wedding with his heir, who was best man. The bride, carrying a large bunch of mimosa, came in a dosed carriage with Lady Kincaird. The newspapers head the wedding «i»Peer's Hyde Park Romance. Marries Rich Bride at Registry Office«/i».
      Baron Headley, when interviewed at the reception which was held at Claridge's, said that early in the war he was speaking at an anti-German meeting in Hyde Park and conversed with another speaker. Afterwards he learned that she was Mrs. Baynton. They went to tea together, and the marriage was the sequel.
      Baron Headley was once a noted amateur boxer. Mrs. Baynton kept her engagement a secret, and surprised a few friends by asking them whether they would like to come along to see her married.
      Baron Headley is an engineer and has frequently undertaken schemes to prevent the erosion of the British coast. Among his recent ideas was a tunnel under the Goodwin Sands to secure "undreamt of wealth" in the shape of sunken treasure from ships of a bygone age.
      The newspapers eulogise Mrs. Baynton's work for the soldiers during the war. Interviewed prior to the ceremony, Mrs. Baynton, who is the mother-in-law of Mr. Harry Gullett the Australian war correspondent, said she carried mimosa as a memento of her association with the Australian troops. She wore the opals presented to her by Australians in London in recognition of her war work.
      Baron Headley is President of the Royal Society of Engineers. He will address a meeting at Birmingham on Saturday, the bride remarking that the rest of the honeymoon would be spent in that romantic centre.

      DEATH. 28 May 1929, The Lodge, Moonga-road, Toorak, Victoria, Australia
      OBITUARY. Lady Headley, the mother of Mrs. Henry Gullett, wife of the Minister for Trade and Customs, died to-day at her home, The Lodge, Moonga-road, Toorak.
      Lady Headley, who had been well known in literary and artistic circles in England and Australia, spent her youth in New South Wales, but of later years she travelled much, making the journey between England and Australia very frequently.
      Besides Mrs. Gullett, Lady Headley leaves two sons of her first marriage, Mr. A. Hayfrater, of Sydney, and Captain Hayfrater, of London. As a writer of considerable merit, Lady Headley was best known under the name of Barbara Baynton, which she used after her second marriage to Dr. Baynton, of New South Wales.
      Her marriage to Lord Headley took place in London in 1921. Lord Headley achieved considerable notoriety some years ago by embracing the Mohammedan faith, to which he still adheres.

      CREMATION. Fawkner Crematorium, Victoria, Australia. Ashes to be placed beside that of her second husband, Thomas Baynton, at Waverley Cemetery, Sydney, NSW
      «b»
      From Sally davis - March 2013«/b»

      Dr Thomas Baynton Jnr of 62 Moncur Street Woollahra who at this point, was married to Barbara Jane (Lawrence), and her niece Amy Beatrice Lawrence was also visiting and that is how my grandparents met. So in essence, I am related to the Bayntons by blood and marriage. Barbara was hugely younger than Thomas (his second wife) but it seems they were soul-mates and he introduced her to Sydney society and intellectuals of the time. He often wrote for 'The Bulletin' and she started doing so as well, she then went on to publish a book of short stories called BUSH STUDIES which brought her fame in Australia and England. There is a fascinating (I think) book about her called BARBARA BAYNTON - Between Two Worlds by Penne Hackforth-Jones, I don't know if you are interested but it is fairly inexpensive on ABEbooks. She died in 1921 leaving a fortune of about 126,000 pounds which she had made herself through share trading, bringing English antiques to Melbourne and selling them at a profit and she also dealt in Emeralds which she brought into the country and Black Opals which she took back to England



      STORY BEHIND WILL. Bush Cabin to Manor. SYDNEY, Tonight. Behind the cabled announcement during the week that Lady Barbara Janet Ainsleigh Headley had left £160,332 is a story of the romantic life of a New South Wales country girl and of the realisation of a childhood dream to become an author.
      Seventy years ago Barbara Kilpatrick was born in Scone. Her parents were simple country folk. In 1897, at the age of 33, Barbara, had her first short story published in "The Bulletin," Sydney. Five years later "Bush Studies" appeared, and in 1907 "Human Toll" was published in London.
      She tried her first matrimonial venture in 1880, and 10 years later she married Thomas Baynton. As Barbara Baynton she achieved success as a novelist.
      In 1921 the girl from the Hunter River married her third husband, George Allanson-Winn, the fifth baron of Headley. He was 66 and Barbara was in the sixties.
      Her daughter Penelope, who is married to Mr. H. S. Gullett (former Minister for Customs) will enjoy an annuity of £500 during her life. Lady Headley's grandson, Henry Gullett, will have an annuity of £100 for life on his attaining the age of 21, and her granddaughter, Susan Gullett, an annuity of £500 for life on her attaining the age of 18. Penelope Gullett and her children also receive about two-thirds of the residuary estate.

      (2013). A FEARSOME INTERLOCUTOR. «i»Baynton's life makes for a fascinating read \endash a tough, fiercely independent woman who nonetheless opposed women's suffrage \endash a complex character indeed«/i».
      When her husband Alex took up with another woman, Barbara filed for and received one of the first divorces in the colony after the law was changed to allow women to file. She lied about her age and about her father being a Presbyterian minister. She also claimed to be childless to get a job as a housekeeper in Sydney for Dr. Thomas Baynton, a retired widower. They married soon after and Dr. Baynton allowed Barbara's three children to move in.
      The Bayntons seem to have enjoyed a mutually supportive and relatively equal marriage. When Dr. Baynton died in 1904, he left Barbara his entire estate. The law had only recently been changed to allow women to inherit in their own names. She learned to play the stock market from books \endash within ten years, she was earning annually the original sum he had left her. She was an early investor in the Broken Hill Proprietary Company, now known as BHP Billiton, and a shrewd buyer of opals and antique furniture. Her wealth bought her far more freedom than most women of her time and she soon became friends with leading Australians, including the Prime Minister Billy Hughes and Dame Nellie Melba. Hughes, who spent over fifty years in colonial and federal parliament, ranked her "the most fearsome interlocutor" he had ever faced.
      She bought an estate in England and during World War I, she lodged roughly 8,000 Australian servicemen on leave in London. Abroad for the first time, and sometimes younger than the regulation eighteen, diggers were ripe pickings for dishonest cabbies, landlords and prostitutes, at least as Baynton would have it. "One day he leaves the thunder of guns and shells and deadly poison gas. When he leaves these and other atrocities created by the worse than cannibal Huns, and comes for a short respite, say, to London, small wonder that the prowling harlot, even if she spoke but broken English and borders on the half-century finds these boys easy victims." She wrote newspaper articles extolling the diggers, and was instrumental in the first wave of formulating the national identity that was cohering after Gallipoli.

      «b»Sources
      «/b» Rowland Allanson-Winn, 5th Baron Headley: «u»<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rowland_Allanson-Winn,_5th_Baron_Headley>«/u»
      «tab» Birth: «u»<http://biography.yourdictionary.com/barbara-baynton>«/u»
      «tab»Divorce (1888): «i»The Sydney Morning Herald«/i» (NSW : 1842 - 1954) 12 Dec 1888, p5 «u»<http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/13706830>«/u»
      «tab»Divorce (1890): «i»The Sydney Morning Herald«/i» (NSW : 1842 - 1954) 5 Mar 1890, p9 «u»<http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/13761904>«/u»
      «tab»Marriage (3): «u»<https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QVZK-R85T>«/u»
      «tab»Marriage (3): «i»The Mail«/i» (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) 12 Feb 1921, p1 «u»<http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/63885904>«/u»
      «tab»Obituary: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) 29 May 1929, p19
      «tab»Story Behind the Will: «i»The Mail«/i» (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) 19 Oct 1929, p3 «u»<http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/63435603>«/u»
      «i»«tab»A Fearsome Interlocutor«/i», by Lucas Smith, Culture Club,18 Jul 2013, «u»<http://sheilas.org.au/2013/07/barbara-baynton/>«/u»
    • (Research):See attached sources. [5]

  • Sources 
    1. [S979] Marriage of Alexander Frater to Barbara Lawrence, New South Wales Births Deaths and Marriages, Certificate No. 4969.

    2. [S2445] Marriage Cert. Reg No.336, 1980. Thomas Baynton and Barbara Frater nee Lawrence..

    3. [S131] Marriage Cert. Reg No. 7646, Barbara Frater nee Lawrence and Thomas Baynton. 1895..

    4. [S130] From the book edited by Sally Krimmer and Alan Lawson, 1980. The Portable Barbara Baynton..

    5. [S1149] http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A070221b.htm.